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Slender: The Arrival

Posted by on April 2nd, 2015 | 0 Comments | Tags:

I find Slenderman and the story around its creation to be rather fascinating. I also think the concept of what Slenderman is to be really scary. The idea of a human-like figure that’s just slightly off combined with the disappearing kids angle is the kind of thing that creeps me out the most. Of course it’s not always kids vanishing and with things like Marble Hornets out there the story around Slenderman seems to typically be the same. Someone has seen too much, there’s mysterious markings all over the walls, and there’s usually a mysterious person involved who we only know through their initials. Such is the case with Slender: The Arrival. Our friend is missing so we’ve made the trip to their house armed with a camera in order to figure out just what happened.

In addition to the camera, that comes complete with a recording overlay that can be toggled on/off, you also come into possession of a flashlight pretty early in the game. From there most of the game is just a matter of exploring each location, occasionally interacting with things in the environment, some very light puzzle solving, and making sure you don’t have a run in with our friend Slendy. The game starts out in your friend’s abandoned house (complete with weird markings on the wall) before moving to the forest, an abandoned mine, and then a few other locations that I’ll refrain from mentioning as not to spoil anything. The gameplay itself isn’t anything special, but it does what it needs in order to move the story along. There’s also the fact that this game was built around the 8-pages Slenderman game. Which means there’s a couple sections where you’ll need to collect/activate a set number of things that are scattered in an open environment before progressing. These sections are short, but I didn’t really care for them that much. Finding 8 pages in the woods with Slender chasing you can be pretty creepy, but it also kind of feels out of place for what the rest of the game is.

If you’re familair with Slenderman lore then the story here won’t be all that different. There are a few surprises, but The Arrival covers all of the essentials in the ways that you’d expect. That said I think the game does a good job of demonstrating how terrifying Slenderman can be. It’s great at blending Slenderman in with the background so that you might completely miss him. There’s a lot of subtle touches that are pretty creepy if you see them, but can be totally missed by those less observant. I also love that Slenderman isn’t something that will chase you. It’s always there. Always watching. Unfortunately that doesn’t mean that the game doesn’t include some – other – things that do chase you.

Slender to me always demonstrates why it’s so scary to feel like someone or something is watching you. I think Slenderman The Arrival succeeds in doing that. At the same time I think the gameplay and story could be more interesting. It’s pretty cool that Slender has its own game, I just wish it was better.

A copy of this game was provided by the publisher for review purposes. For more info on our review policy click here.

General Info

  • Players:
  • Ratings:
  • 8 Pages segment
  • Uninteresting gameplay
  • Wish it was a little bit longer