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Review: Diner Dash

Posted by on December 10th, 2009 | 0 Comments | Tags:

Diner Dash is exactly as good as one would expect from a multi-million dollar casual game that’s universally popular: a simple, addicting, straightforward game with minimal fuss. You play as Flo the waitress, formally Flo the businesswoman in some uninspired intro cutscenes, and you must seat customers in your restaurant, take their order, bring their food to them, be their cashier, and clean the table for the next patron. It’s exactly that simple on the level that I described, though you can match different colored people to their matching colored chairs for extra points. Get enough points and you move on to the next level, where a new challenge awaits and usually an extra item or two, like a coffee machine to calm down customers.

What’s new in this version of Diner Dash for consoles are custom soundtracks, online gameplay, and a variety of modes for online and local multiplayer. Particularly great is the local co-op, where you can team up with a friend and go on an endless shift until you run out of stars. This is quite a bit of fun, more so than the rest of the game really, and is definitely the way to play (but sadly you cannot progress through the main story via co-op). If you have a girlfriend/wife/significant other, then you’re probably already trying to hide the fact that the game is available on the PS3 lest you lose valuable hours of gaming time to them. Just give in now and save yourself the trouble.

Oh, and you get a free trophy just for buying the game. The idea of handing out a free trophy when the devs could have just awarded it after the first level is a bit odd to me, and kinda defeats the purpose of trophies to begin with, but ah well.

For more info on our review policy click here. This review is for the PlayStation 3 version of the game.

General Info

  • A bit too simple for more hardcore type players.
  • Not enough notifications to let the user know when they lost a star or something bad happens (Note: I played with custom soundtracks on, so I could not hear cues done by game music)