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Review: A Boy and His Blob

Posted by on January 28th, 2016 | 1 Comment | Tags:

A Boy and His Blob from beginning to end is delightful, imaginative, and downright adorable. Over the course of forty levels the boy and blob duo work together to solve puzzles, free fellow Blobolonians, and ultimately take down an evil emperor. There’s a real sense of friendship that forms between boy and blob throughout their journey which is then capped off by the implementation of a ‘hug button’. If ever the journey seems too much all it takes is a quick hug to keep spirits high. It’s also about the cutest thing I’ve ever seen in a game.

To progress through the game the boy and blob will need to work together to solve a plethora of different puzzles. The boy is equipped with several types of jelly beans that, when consumed by the blob, give it a unique ability. A trampoline, ladder, rocket ship, and cannon are just a small representation of what the blob is capable of. What’s most impressive is that the game is able to consistently introduce new types of jelly beans that open up the opportunity for new types of puzzles. There’s always something new to try right up until the very end.

All that’s required to finish a stage is to find the gold jelly bean at the end. However, each stage also features three treasure chests that, when collected, add new things to your current hub area. This also leads to unlockable challenge levels in the game for you to complete. It’s in getting these collectibles where the game’s true challenge emerges. These treasure chests are often hidden behind some rather difficult puzzles that’ll require you to use every jelly bean at your disposal.

The forty stages in the game are split into four distinct areas and offer up a boss fight after every tenth stage. These boss encounters are pretty simple puzzles that often reflect the ‘rule of three’ trope. With one exception I found myself really enjoying the boss fights throughout the game. They’re pretty simple and mostly come down to trial and error, but finally overcoming each encounter felt really good. The one boss encounter I didn’t much care for revolved around the use of a giant bubble that the boy could roll around in. I found this ability to be difficult to control and the boss encounter itself not that interesting.

It’s hard not to instantly fall in love with this unlikely duo. The blob isn’t just a pet for the boy, but it’s a very capable companion. They help each other and a lasting friendship forms over the course of the game. A playthrough of the game won’t present too much of a challenge, but even after the credits roll there’s still plenty of collectibles to gather and challenge rooms to complete. A Boy and His Blob is an easy recommendation and one that had me grinning from ear-to-ear throughout its entirety.

A copy of this game was [provided by the publisher]/[purchased] for review purposes. For more info on our review policy click here.

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  • The bubble mode for the blob is kind of difficult to control

  • I’m also really enjoying this game. And agree, the bouncing bubble is pretty tough on some parts,