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5 Things the New PlayStation Store Needs to Fix

Posted by on November 2nd, 2012 | 13 Comments | Tags:

The new PlayStation Store is live and there is much to relearn about navigating, sorting, and searching for games. Chris showed you all how to find the New Games section, but now I’d like the world to know about what falls a bit short of expectations.

Many of these listed items are simply bugs that will likely see a fix sometime in the future. Consumers should be the ones to tell those responsible what features we’d like to see? I’d like to think that is acceptable, and coming from a testing background with the company I speak of, I always appreciated and often sought out the help of consumers.

Without further hesitation, here are 5 things that the new PlayStation Store needs to fix:

5. Long Load Times

The time it takes to get into the new PlayStation Store is at least two to three times longer than it used to be. Chances are this is one of the last things that will ever get fixed, since content and layout precede simple displeasures like this. For me, this is just another oversight that makes me wish the updated store was an option.

4. Unused Shortcuts

The Video Store shortcut and Game Store shortcut from the Video and Game column of the XMB simply take you to the Welcome screen. Maybe this is due to Sony wanting everyone to step on that new welcome mat every single time we enter the new store. But aren’t those bloatware shortcuts there for a reason? Isn’t that reason to get to those sections of the store more quickly? Right now they just seem unnecessary.

3. Misleading Text

This one is actually important to note. While browsing through the plethora of content, you may have noticed that on the filterable and sortable screen before you click a particular game to seek more information or make a purchase, it will clearly state that you’ve “Downloaded” or “Purchased” that title.

The problem is if you’ve previously downloaded the demo only, it will say “Purchased” here given you the fleeting feeling you were just given the game for free. Talk about misleading. Every PS3 and Vita demo I’ve downloaded now says that I’ve “Purchased” the game. But if I select the game and get to its details screen, laying in waiting is a new “Choose a Version” option that prompts me to buy the game, or re-download the demo. There must be a better way to do this, one that isn’t so misleading on the screen before.

2. Missing Filter

The Age Rating filter is missing from the entire PS3 games section and the All PSP Games section. You can sort by Age Rating while browsing Vita games and this can be extremely helpful if you’re trying to find something more age appropriate for the kiddies. This is especially needed when all that can be seen from the first screen of nearly every category is gory images and Assassin’s Creed III marketing.

The sorting and filtering of content is supposed to be one of the bigger selling points of this new store.  To omit one filter choice of such high importance with regards to appropriate content choices is something that needs to be addressed. As a father, games rank high on the list of rewards with my 5 year old daughter and I’d like to see what other games are good for her age group.

1. The Download List

This is something that was needed at least two years ago when the amount of content the average gamer had downloaded was quickly reaching 1000 items. Being required to scroll down that endless list looking for one item is quite literally searching for a needle in a haystack.

While this list may seem a bit harsh, there are plenty of things I really like about the new store design. All the content cards seem to load a bit faster, albeit with a jarring slowdown to the scroll effect. Finally, streaming videos don’t play on a loop. And having so many different ways to sort content is a blessing in disguise.

Now is your turn to add to this list. What issues have you seen in your quest to understand the redesigned PS Store? Please do voice your concerns in the comments section and maybe a certain perspicacious Sony employee will read them, someone whom frequents PSNStores.